National Sports Day is commended in academic foundations and sports scholastics all through the world, as a tribute to brilliant sportsmen and sportsmanship. In India, National Sports Day is praised on 29th August all over India in different instructive establishments and sports scholastics. This day is set apart by festivities by sorting out different sorts of games occasions and different projects went for empowering the prevalence of games in the nation. Every nation commends its games day by facilitating its customary and additionally prominent diversions like football, b-ball, yard tennis, volleyball, and long distance races. Numerous schools likewise mastermind sports occasions and competitions on this day to support their sportsman soul and teach in them a soul of intensity.

Top 10 Sports IN School Sports Days

On this day, schools across the country celebrate this day as their annual sports day. This is done to develop a positive attitude towards sports, encourage the popularity of games and sports and provide an opportunity for youngsters to prove their mettle at whatever sports they might be playing. Sports day is a commonplace occasion commonly held once per year in every school. On the off chance that the entire school takes an interest, understudies can be partitioned by evaluations for groups or evaluations might be isolated by classrooms for groups. Understudies have doled out a group shading that they wear on games day, and an assortment of open air, group exercises are performed for focuses.

1)Races

There are a variety of races that are popular with sports days. In a three-legged race, students are paired up; they stand next to each other and their two legs in the middle are tied together, giving them “three legs.” Students will then race a specified, usually short, distance. There is also the potato sack race. Here, children stand inside of large potato sacks and jump the distance of the race. Finally, there is a plain-old relay race. Generally, around track is used and teams are spread around the track. The first child will run to the second and pass off a baton, who will in turn run and pass the baton to the third child and so on until the last team member crosses the finish line.

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2)Handball

History

  • Handball was first introduced at the Olympics in 1936, although it did not appear again until 1972. It has been an ever-present since then, with a women’s competition introduced four years later. Goalball is considered by many to be the Paralympic equivalent of handball.
  • Results have been mixed. France is one of four countries to have won the men’s competition on two separate occasions, although they lead the medal table by virtue of having four medals in total. Denmark has won the women’s competition three times.
  • Team GB last competed in the Olympic handball event in London in 2012. Both the men’s and women’s team lost all five of their group matches and went out of the competition at the first stage.

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The Basics

  • Each team consists of six outfield players and a goalkeeper. Each goal is worth one point and the team with the most points at the end of the game wins. When in possession, a player can pass, shoot or dribble the ball – similar to in basketball.
  • A player is permitted to take up to three steps for up to three seconds at a time without dribbling the ball. Further key rules include no player being allowed in the goalkeeper’s area and not being able to pass back to the goalkeeper whilst he remains in his area.
  • Handball also has its own version of penalties. When a clear chance of scoring is illegally prevented anywhere on the court by an opposing team player, the result is a seven-meter throw for the attacking team, one-against-one with the goalkeeper.

3)Football

History

  • The FA Cup, England’s national cup competition, is the oldest association football competition in the world. It was first held at the climax of the 1871-72 season, with Wanderers defeating Royal Engineers 1-0 at the Kensington Oval.
  • As well as competing in domestic competitions, including the FA Cup and the Premier League and English Football League, the best teams from each country will also compete in continental competitions, such as the Champions League – previously the European Cup.
  • Women’s’ football has been played for many years but the game really took off in 2010 when The Women’s Super League was formed, with Liverpool Ladies, Manchester City Ladies, Arsenal Ladies and Chelsea Ladies all winning the title since its inception.
  • An international competition, the World Cup, has also been held for men’s national teams since 1930. Brazil is the competition’s most successful team having won the tournament on five occasions. England has won it once, in 1966.
  • Wembley Stadium, London is the National Stadium and St George’s Park, Burton is the National Training Centre, which is home to The FA’s 24 National Sides.

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The Basics

  • A game which involves kicking a ball into a rectangular goal with a net. Players will generally score with their feet, but can actually use any part of their body apart from their hands and arms. The game always starts with a kick off from the centre mark of the pitch
  • Each team has a designated goalkeeper, who is permitted to use their hands and arms within a marked area, to try and prevent the opposing team from scoring.
  • Various other rules are in place to prevent foul play or unsportsmanlike conduct, e.g. the offside rule (in 9v9 and 11v11), which prevents attacking players from waiting by the opposition’s goal, so they are best placed to shoot when the ball comes to them.

4)Basketball

History

  • Basketball was first played in Massachusetts in 1891. After twice being used as an Olympic demonstration sport, basketball made its official Olympic debut in 1936. Only four teams have won gold – USA, Argentina, Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.
  • Wheelchair basketball has been part of the Paralympics since 1960 and has again been dominated by the Americans, who have won the tournament on eight occasions. Paralympics GB have won eight medals in the sport – three silvers and five bronzes.
  • The sport is best known for the National Basketball Association (NBA), which has run seasonal competitions since 1950. The Boston Celtics, with 17 championship wins, are the most successful team in the competition’s history.

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The Basics

  • Teams must dribble or pass a ball from one end of a court to another. A team scores by successfully getting the ball through the hoop their opponents are defending. Each basket is worth points and the team with the most points wins.
  • Shots from open play are worth either two points or three points depending on the distance from which the shot is taken. Penalty shots, where opponents cannot attempt to block, are worth one point.
  • Dribbling the ball involves bouncing it against the floor. Penalties are given against players who hold the ball for too long or move without bouncing it. A defending team can turn the ball over by forcing a penalty or by intercepting a pass or shot.

5)Dodgeball

History

  • Dodgeball began in the UK in 2005 with the first competitive match taking place between Leeds Metropolitan and Stafford University. Since then the sport has increased in popularity year on year with leagues, opens and championships being run throughout a competitive season by British Dodgeball.
  • Dodgeball in schools has grown in popularity too since 2005 with safe and competitive formats of the sport available for children of all ages. British Dodgeball supports youth dodgeball through its competition pathway and school games delivery.
  • The International game sees teams from across the World compete at World Cups and Continental Championships. The current men’s and mixed team World and European Champions are England. They will be looking to continue their success this summer at the Dodgeball World Cup in Madison Square Garden, New York.

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The Basics

  • Two teams start on opposing sides of a court. Three dodgeballs are lined up on the centre line and players from each team race to retrieve them at the start of the game.
  • A game then proceeds with both sets of players trying to take the opposition’s players out of the game, either by striking them with a ball they have thrown before it bounces, or by catching a ball thrown by an opponent – a successful catch also allows the defending team to regain a player that has previously been taken out of the game.
  • A game lasts for a maximum of 3 minutes and a team can win a game by eliminating all the opposition players within the 3 minute time period or having more players remaining on their side of the court at the end of 3 minutes.

6)Cricket

History

  • Cricket traces its origins back to South-East England and the 16th century. However, it took another 300 years for the sport to fully establish itself within British society and begin to garner attention from overseas.
  • The first officially recognised Test match took place in 1877. There are currently twelve nations that play test match cricket, the longest and most traditional form of the game. The most famous match-up is between England and Australia, known as ‘The Ashes’.
  • The Cricket World Cup, a competition involving one-day matches, first took place in 1975. Australia is the most successful nation with five titles. An even shorter format, the T20 World Cup (involving matches with only 20 overs for each side), was born in 2007.

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The Basics

  • During a standard cricket match each team has a turn at batting, attempting to score runs, and at fielding, attempting to prevent runs being made. The team which has scored the most runs at the end of the game wins.
  • Players bat in pairs and attempt to score runs by hitting the ball to the boundary rope or by running between the wickets. They can be given out if the ball hits their wicket, a fielder catches their shot before the ball bounces, or their leg prevents the ball hitting the wicket (knows as LBW or ‘leg before wicket’).
  • The fielding team nominate a bowler to bowl a six-ball over. Once they have completed this then someone else on the team must takeover. An innings will continue until the batting side have lost ten wickets or a set number of overs have been bowled.

7)Fencing

History

  • Competitive fencing is one of five activities which have been featured in every one of the modern Olympic Games, the other four being athletics, cycling, swimming, and gymnastics.
  • Italy (125 medals) and France (118) are the two most successful nations in the sport’s Olympic history. Great Britain has only won nine fencing medals – one gold and eight silvers. The former came for ten-time British champion Gillian Sheen in 1956.
  • Wheelchair Fencing takes place at the Summer Paralympics. France, with 144 medals, is the most successful nation, with Italy second on 80 medals. Great British is in seventh place with a total of 41 medals.

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The Basics

  • There are three forms of modern fencing. Each type involves using a different style of weapon and a different set of rules. However, the basic objective of each discipline is to score points by making contact with your opponent.
  • The foil is a flexible, lightweight, rectangular-shaped sword. Points are scored by touching the chest of your opponent with the tip of the blade. The epee is similar in shape but is bigger and heavier than the foil. Again, points are scored with the tip of the blade, but competitors are permitted to strike anywhere on the body.
  • The sabre permits competitors to score with the edge of the blade, ensuring its place as the fastest and most challenging discipline. 

8)Badminton

History

  • Badminton was developed in British India in the mid-19th century, although games involving shuttlecocks – such as Battledore – have been played for around 2,000 years.
  • The sport made its Olympic debut in 1992 and is due to be inducted into the Paralympics in Tokyo in 2020, together with taekwondo. China is by far the most successful nation with 41 medals. Denmark is the most successful European nation with eight.
  • Team GB have won three Olympic medals in the sport, one silver and two bronze, the most recent of which came in Rio in 2016 when Chris Langridge and Marcus Ellis finished third in the men’s doubles.

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The Basics

  • The game follows the same basic format of many racquet sports, with competitors attempting to hit the shuttlecock (used in place of a ball) onto their opponent’s side of the court. If that opponent fails to make a legal return, the first player wins the point.
  • The shuttlecock is a plastic projectile shaped like a small cone and is formed by having sixteen overlapping feathers (or a plastic skirt) around a cork base. Its unique shape makes it challenging for new players to hit, as it impacts both its flight and movement.
  • Each point starts with the serving player striking the shuttlecock diagonally to their opponent’s serving area. The rally continues until a player misses the shuttlecock, hits it out of the playing area, or fails to return a shot onto their opponent’s side of the net.

9)Athletics

History

  • Athletics has been a cornerstone of the Olympic Games since its inaugural edition in 1896. It has also been in every Paralympic Games since the disability competition was introduced in 1960.
  • The most successful Olympic athlete is Finnish long-distance runner Paavo Nurmi, who won nine gold medals and three silver medals between 1920 and 1928. Only swimmer Michael Phelps has won more gold medals.
  • Team GB has won 201 Olympic athletics medals, more than twice as many as in any other sport, with 55 of those medals gold. Only the United States, with 801, has won more Olympic athletics medals than Team GB.

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The Basics

  • Athletics events are usually relatively simple to run, with the winner determined by who runs or walks an allotted distance the quickest, or who jumps or throws something – such as a shot put or a javelin – the furthest.
  • Events are divided by different disciplines, with races run from anything between 100 metres and the 26.2 miles of a marathon. There are also different variations of jumping events, including long jump, triple jump or pole vault.
  • Whilst events are traditionally run as individual competitions, there are team variations, such as a relay race – which involve passing a baton between team members over the course of a race.

10)Archery

History

  • Archery made its debut at the Olympic Games in 1900. It has been a permanent fixture in the Games since 1972 where it returned after more than a 50 year absence. The most successful nation has been South Korea, with 39 medals, 23 of them gold.
  • Team GB are fifth on the list of the most successful Olympic nations, winning nine medals, although they are some way behind France in fourth place who have 24. The United States and Belgium are the other nations above us.
  • Paralympics GB has won 60 medals since the sport debuted in 1960, 18 more than any other country, although the United States have won 18 gold medals, compared to the 17 won by GB.

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The Basics

  • A target archery competition involves shooting at a ten ring target. Each ring is worth a different pointed value depending on how close to the centre it is – with the outermost ring worth one point and the central ring worth ten points.
  • An archery target involves five different colours with an ‘outer’ and ‘inner’ ring of each colour. The five colours are white, black, blue, red, and gold – with inner gold being worth the most points.
  • In a team game, members of the same team take it in turns to shoot, with their points cumulated to make a team total. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.

Cycling

History

  • Cycling has been in every Olympic Games, dating back to 1896. France is the most successful nation, with 90 medals, whilst Great Britain is in third place; Italy is second. Team GB has won 87 medals, 32 of which were gold.
  • The three most successful Olympic cyclists ever are British – Bradley Wiggins, Chris Hoy and Jason Kenny have won 22 medals between them, including 17 golds. Team GB has been dominant in recent years, winning eight golds in 2012 and six in 2016.
  • Paralympics GB has also enjoyed plenty of success in cycling. In Rio we won 21 medals, 12 of which were gold, narrowly failing to surpass the 22 medals we won four years earlier in London.

The Basics

  • Track cycling is predominately held in specially built banked tracks, known as velodromes. There are different types of races – including a straight sprint, or more complex variations that involve catching up to or overtaking an opponent within a set time.
  • One of the most popular Olympic track cycling events, the omnium, involves six races: a scratch race (first to finish), an individual pursuit, an elimination race, a time trial, a flying lap against the clock, and a points race, where points are awarded based on a rider’s performance during each lap.
  • Road cycling is the more traditional format. Races are usually over much longer distances and are a test of stamina as much as they are speed and skill. In recent years, the Olympic Games have also included a BMX race over a short and challenging track.

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